Maserati GranTurismo EV Will Battle Tesla Roadster

With the several budget brands debuting a number of electric crossovers this year, as well as the reveal of an electric F-150 from Ford this spring, it feels like it’s been a while since we’ve heard from one of the Italian sports car makers. Maserati changed that this week by reminding the world that new EV and gasoline models are on its way in coupe and cabriolet form.

Slated to arrive in a matter of months, the GranTurismo and GranCabriolet will be offered in electric as well as gasoline and hybrid forms, with the duo set to play a rather traditional role in Maserati’s lineup. The Italian automaker, part of Stellantis, revealed several teaser images of the upcoming GranTurismo and GranCabriolet, giving us the first official look at the two models. The coupe is expected to arrive in 2022, with the GranCabriolet arriving a short time later, likely in the same year.

True to its name, the GranTurismo will follow in the footsteps of its predecessors when it comes to layout and design, offering plenty of room for two and their luggage, as well as fairly generous exterior dimensions intended to give the model presence on the road. As these teaser images demonstrate, the GranTurismo will feature relatively understated styling, declining to follow other automakers down some treacherous paths when it comes to exterior design.

“The new Maserati GranTurismo will be the Brand’s first car to adopt a 100% electric solution,” the automaker says. “Ahead of the launch of the new model, the prototype cars are currently undergoing a period of intensive road and circuit testing, in various conditions of use, to acquire vital data for the preparation of the final setup.”

Maserati hasn’t shared details about their powerplant lineup for the duo, so it’s a little too early to pick apart the specs. But the stakes for Maserati are perhaps not as high as they might seem, since the EV version will be one of just three powerplants available in the coupe and cabrio, with the Levante doing the heavy lifting in the automaker’s lineup. The lineup is still that of a boutique automaker, so we’re not talking about tens of thousands of units per year for the EV, but rather something a little more exclusive.

From a wider vantage point, the battery-electric versions of the GranTurismo and GranCabriolet will be the first EV models offering these bodystyles, as most other automakers are busy with SUVs, crossovers and sedans at the moment. So these two will be among the first sort-of-affordable electric coupes and cabriolets that at least someone will be able to buy. Their debut should also vaguely coincide with the start of production of the long-delayed Tesla Roadster, which may or may not land in that general timeframe (unless it gets canceled entirely, appearing more and more likely with each passing month).

Maserati had shared the rough outline its electrification plans all the way back in 2019, with the Ghibli hybrid sedan being the first out of the gate, promised to be followed by the MC20 supercar with a battery-electric version of its own, due in 2022. Folgore—Italian for “lightning”—will be used for battery-electric models in the automaker’s lineup, but we’ll see the plug-in hybrid versions of the Levante and Quattroporte shortly thereafter, in late 2022 or 2023. The Grecale SUV, the latest Maserati model to be announced, will receive a battery-electric version as well, in addition to a gas engine, but the timing of its arrival is a little less clear.

“All of Maserati’s new models will be 100% made in Italy and will adopt hybrid and battery electric propulsion systems capable of providing both innovation and the high performance embedded in the brand’s DNA,” the automaker promised in the past. “Maserati’s all-electric models will combine traditional highly appreciated Maserati driving dynamics together with next-generation battery electric technology, offering unique driving modes, extended range and ultra-fast charging capabilities.”

Should other automakers field coupe and convertible EVs, or is the demand too small at the moment? Let us know in the comments below.

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